David Brandenberger–April 4

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, April 4, 5pm-6:15pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown University campus. We will discuss the following paper by David Brandenberger: “The Fate of Soviet Interwar Internationalism: A Case Study of the Editing of Stalin’s 1938 Short Course on the History of the ACP(b).”

David Brandenberger is Associate Professor of History at the University of Richmond and writes on Stalin-era propaganda, ideology, nationalism, and the personality cult. He received his PhD from Harvard in 1999 and his BA from Macalester College. In addition to a variety of articles in leading journals, he has published two books: National Bolshevism: Stalinist Mass Culture and the Formation of Modern Russian National Identity, 1931-1956 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2002) and Propaganda State in Crisis: Soviet Ideology, Indoctrination and Terror under Stalin, 1928-1941 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011). Brandenberger is presently preparing a critical edition of Stalin’s infamous 1938 Short Course on party history with Mikhail V. Zelenov for Yale University Press.

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Don Ostrowski–March 21

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, March 21, 5pm-6:15pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown University campus. We will discuss the following paper by Don Ostrowski: “Principles of Misattribution: The Kurbskii and Shakespeare Authorship Controversies Compared.”

Don Ostrowski is research advisor in the social sciences and lecturer at the Harvard Extension School, where he teaches worldhistory. His publications include Muscovy and the Mongols: Cross-Cultural Influences on the Steppe Frontier, 1304-1589 (1998); The Povest’ vremennykh let: An Interlinear Collation and Paradosis (2003); and (with Marshall Poe) Portraits of Old Russia: Imagined Lives of Ordinary People, 1300-1725 (2011). He also chairs the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies’ Early Slavists Seminarsat Harvard University and is on the editorial board of Brief Chronicles: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Authorship Studies.

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Matthew Romaniello–February 28

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, February 28 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Matthew P. Romaniello of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, “Sprouting New Habits: Tobacco in the Reigns of Anna Ivanovna and Elizaveta Petrovna.”

Matthew P. Romaniello is Associate Professor of History at University of Hawaii at Manoa and associate editor of The Journal of World History. He received his PhD and MA in history from Ohio State University, and a AB from Brown University. He is the author of The Elusive Empire: Kazan and the Creation of Russia, 1552-1671 (2012), and editor of European Encounters with Islam in Asia (2014) with Matthew Lauzon, Contested Spaces of Nobility in Early Modern Europe (2011) with Charles Lipp, and Tobacco in Russian History and Culture (2009) with Tricia Starks.  He is currently completing a monograph on the introduction and adoption of tobacco in imperial Russia, Consuming Tobacco: Russian Habits and Global Trade, 1600-1850, as well as a new edited volume with Tricia Starks, Embodying History: The Sensory in Russia since 1700.

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Anne O’Donnell–February 7

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, February 7 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Anne O’Donnell (Harvard University), “Old Regime Valuables and New Regime Values: Valuation in Soviet Russia, 1917-1922.”

Anne O’Donnell is a postdoctoral Prize Fellow in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University from 2013-2016. She received her AB from Princeton, her MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD from Princeton University, with a dissertation entitled, “A Noah’s Ark: Moscow, Material Life, and the Foundations of Soviet Authority, 1916-1924.”

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Paul Bushkovitch–October 25

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, October 25 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Paul Bushkovitch of Yale University: “Change and Culture in Early Modern Russia.”

Paul Bushkovitch was appointed the Reuben Post Halleck Professor of History at Yale in 2013. He specializes in Russian history through the 18th century, with an emphasis on state, religion, and empire. Bushkovitch received his B.A. (magna cum laude) from Harvard University and his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He joined the Yale faculty in 1975 and served as chair of the Department of History 1992-1996. He is the author ofThe Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 (1980), Religion and Society in Russia, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (1992), (with Maija Jansson and Nikolai Rogozhin) “England and the North: the Russian Embassy of 1613-1614,” Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society 210 (1994), Peter the Great (2001), Peter the Great: The Struggle for Power, 1671-1725 (2001), and A Concise History of Russia (Cambridge, 2012). He is currently working on two book projects:  “Succession to the Throne and the Problem of Absolutism in Russia 1598-1722,” and “The Image of the Monarch in Russia, 900-1740.”In 2011 he was honored by the publication of Religion and Identity in Russia and the Soviet Union: A Festschrift for Paul Bushkovitch, ed. Nikolaos Chrissidis, Cathy Potter, David Schimmelpenninck van der Oye, and Jennifer Spock.

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Richard Stites Memorial Lecture Series: Alfred J. Rieber–November 7

The first in the Richard Stites Memorial Lecture Series will be delivered November 7, 2013 (5pm, ICC Auditorium) by Alfred J. Rieber of the Central European University in Budapest, Professor Emeritus of the University of Pennsylvania, and longstanding friend and colleague of Richard Stites. Dr. Rieber’s talk is titled “The Struggle over the Eurasian Borderlands: La longue durée.”

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Borislav Chernev–October 4

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, October 4 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Borislav Chernev of American University, “National Statehood in Eastern Europe: Ukrainization and Its Contradictions in the Context of the Brest-Litovsk System.”

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Ronald Grigor Suny–September 27

The Russian History Seminar will hold its next meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, September 27 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Ronald Grigor Suny (University of Michigan), “The Making of a Bolshevik: Stalin from Koba to Commissar.”

Ronald Grigor Suny is the Charles Tilly Collegiate Professor of Social and Political History and Director of the Eisenberg Institute of Historical Studies at the University of Michigan, and Emeritus Professor of Political Science and History at the University of Chicago. He was the first holder of the Alex Manoogian Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of Michigan (1981-1995), and the founder and director of the Armenian Studies Program there.

Suny’s fields include Russian/Soviet, Armenian, and Caucasian history; the history and theory of nationalism and empire; and the history of ethnic conflict and genocide. He is the author of seven scholarly books, including The Baku Commune, 1917-1918 (Princeton University Press, 1972); The Making of the Georgian Nation (Indiana University Press, 1988, 1994); Looking Toward Ararat:  Armenia in Modern History (Indiana University Press, 1993); The Revenge of the Past (Stanford University Press, 1993); and The Soviet Experiment (Oxford University Press, 1998). He is also the editor of many collections of essays, including Making Workers Soviet (Cornell University Press, 1994); A State of Nations:  Empire and Nation-making in the Age of Lenin and Stalin (Oxford University Press, 2001); and A Question of Genocide:  Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Suny was elected President of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies for the year 2006; he is the 2013 recipient of the ASEEES award for Distinguished Contributions to Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. You can find his Wikipedia page at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Grigor_Suny

 

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September 13–Bob Geraci

The Russian History Seminar will hold its first meeting of the 2013-2014 academic year on Friday, September 13 at 5 pm in ICC 662 on the Georgetown campus. We will discuss the following paper by Bob Geraci (University of Virginia), “Economic Nationalism and Economic ‘Ethnicism’ in Imperial Russia.”

Professor Geraci is presently researching and writing a book called Imperial Bazaar:  Ethno-National Dimensions of Commerce in Russian Eurasia.  The book explores the implications of the extraordinary ethnic diversity of Russia’s urban trading and entrepreneurial classes primarily from the 18th century to the 1917 revolution, with an epilogue on the Soviet and post-Soviet periods.  It addresses the ways in which ethnic Russians often struggled in the world of commerce to hold their own against successful merchants and producers from minority groups such as Germans, Tatars, Jews, Armenians, Greeks, and foreigners; the expression of economic nationalism to support Russians’ putative role as the empire’s dominant group; stereotypes about the commercial capabilities and behavior of different ethnic groups; and state policies defining the commercial rights of these groups.  The book also compares the ethnic dimensions of commercial life in several major cities of the empire.  Research on the project has taken Professor Geraci to archives and libraries not only around the Russian Federation but also (so far) in Ukraine, Latvia, Georgia, and Azerbaijan.

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